A matter of texture
 
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DavidGrafika
(@davidgrafika)
Member Creative

After a first ride through the blog post at 4:00 in the morning, the way the challenge want to go was a bit fuzzy to my sleepy brain.

Now I have had my coffee, and I read once more, it's more clear and understandable.

There's still one point hurting my brain: texture.

To be honest, this is a photo concept I always have difficulties to understand, probably because of the French word "texture", which send you back to a physical feeling, when you're touching the surface of any object.

How do you understand, and could you try to give me some help about this word, please? :)

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Posted : 12/01/2020 11:51 am
Maëlick (aka Reiterlied)
(@reiterlied)
Member Crew

As far as I know, the meaning of texture is not so much different in English than in French. Even in French, texture is not limited to the physical feeling but also the visual appearance of an irregular surface. (See definition 3 here.) Think about a piece of wood: it has texture. Even if you smooth it out so it doesn't feel rough anymore when touching it, it can keep a visual texture.

That said, there is often a relationship between physical and visual textures because physical irregularities can be accentuated with light and shadows. And these can, in turn, be accentuated in post-processing, for example using clarity like Boris mentioned in the blog post.

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Posted : 14/01/2020 4:26 pm
Maëlick (aka Reiterlied)
(@reiterlied)
Member Crew

More thoughts that involve LEGO and photography...

Take a slope brick. If you touch the sides, it is very smooth like most ABS pieces. But the slope is more irregular. It's something you feel when touching and can see if you look closely. It's also something you can photograph.

Depending on how you would light the brick, the texture would be more or less pronounced and visible. If you have very soft and even light, the texture won't be strong and might not even be visible. If you have more directed light, and thus more shadows, it would be more visible and obvious to the viewer.

It's not something we use a lot in LEGO photography because ABS is so smooth. But if you take other toys they can have more texture and it's something that can be accentuated with light. The first examples that come to my mind are the Schleich dinosaurs.

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Posted : 14/01/2020 4:37 pm
DavidGrafika
(@davidgrafika)
Member Creative

Thanks Maëlick for this answer. 
The use of the word « texture » appeared in the softwares a long time after I get my processing routines, and I never explored this way. 
Time to change that! ^^

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Posted : 14/01/2020 9:30 pm
Maëlick (aka Reiterlied)
(@reiterlied)
Member Crew

@davidgrafika

Do you mean Lightroom's texture slider? If yes, then I never used it either. From what I've heard it's like clarity but it doesn't impact contrast as much.

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Posted : 15/01/2020 7:31 pm
DavidGrafika
(@davidgrafika)
Member Creative

@reiterlied

Yes, that’s it. 
the word and processing function « texture » appeared in almost all photography softwares, and remains a mystery to me on « what to do with ».

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Posted : 16/01/2020 5:05 am
Maëlick (aka Reiterlied)
(@reiterlied)
Member Crew

@davidgrafika

Well, you can use it to increase or decrease the (visual) texture effect. But there might not be much to increase or decrease if your photo mostly includes smooth ABS plastic :D

Maybe I should make a post about it after taking photos with the Schleich dinos that I got yesterday :-)

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Posted : 16/01/2020 5:38 pm
DavidGrafika
(@davidgrafika)
Member Creative

@reiterlied

That would be great. ^^

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Posted : 16/01/2020 7:08 pm
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