Getting that prehistoric paycheck

Recently, Shelly wrote a post about Fair Use for Toy Photographers that got me thinking about my own brushes with selling my artwork. I’ve been interested in making money since I started making and sharing my art. Like all toy photographers, except maybe custom artists like @krash_override, I’m bound by the toys I purchase, so to profit from depicting a recognizable brand seems to be a legal gray area. Continue reading “Getting that prehistoric paycheck”

Assembling the #toydinosquad

When I started posting photos of toy dinosaurs on Instagram I was alone. I searched through any hashtag I could think of to try and find anyone doing what I was doing. The big toy photography group pages we’re filled with Stormtroopers, Super Heroes and Lego, but no other prehistoric creatures. I would get comments like “Original idea!” which was nice to hear, but reinforced how out on my own I was. Or so I thought. Continue reading “Assembling the #toydinosquad”

65 Million Years Ago …

In the beginning I had absolutely no idea what I was doing.

I had been working on a dinosaur-themed comic book and purchased a few toy dinosaurs to help with anatomical designs. The Allosaurus was first, but soon followed by a Triceratops and a Velociraptor. All made by the French brand, Papo.

They had almost no articulation, but the detail of the sculpt and paintwork were unparalleled. That’s what really caught my attention, the realism of the figures. Continue reading “65 Million Years Ago …”

An Oasis in the Desert

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Eight months ago, Shelly (@xxsjc) Paul (@bricksailboat) Nick (@wiiman) and I sat at a bar in Seattle, enjoying a cold beer on a warm afternoon, having just finished a group photography outing. We marveled at the engaging experience our photo safaris tended to be and decided to invite others to come meet us… in Las Vegas.

Last weekend, I found myself in the beautiful Nevada desert taking photos of toys with a dozen other people. They had traveled from miles away to hang out (and in my case bunk) with folks they had never met. Each had their own artistic abilities, interests and styles, but the rocky landscapes seemed to bring out everyone’s best. Figures were borrowed and techniques were discussed, all with a peppering of laughter and playful competition. We got to know each other throughout the weekend, but nothing was more impressive to me than the positive attitudes and good-natured sensibilities that I encountered from this amazing group of artists.

While waiting to board my flight home I thought about why I felt so good. Why did I have such a strong sense of pride about a silly little meet-up? Two things come to mind. First, because we actually did it. People talk all the time about things they ‘want to do’ but we just did it. That is tragically rare and utterly awesome. Secondly, because I have been fortunate to photograph toys with my friends and it was wonderful to help others see how great that can be. Photography tends to be an isolating experience in many ways, but if you can go shooting with another person it becomes altogether different, if not improved.

We’ve begun talking about the next #toyphotosafari and I look forward to seeing my friends again, but nothing has me more excited than the thought of adding to our numbers. Finding others who love to take pictures of toys, bringing them together and share the fun of group photo sessions; that’s the new challenge and reward ahead.
That’s why I feel so good.
Jaiken – @dinoczars

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